Friday, September 5, 2014

colorplay @ Raza Cosmica


 

color play
Exhibition by Jon Vogt and Abby Sherril at Raza Cosmica, an Oil and Cotton window gallery.

August 10 - September 5, 2014

Closing Reception September 5th, 7:00pm
 
Jon Vogt and Abby Sherrill, graduate students at the University of North Texas, collaborated to produce color play, currently on view at Oil and Cotton through September 5th. Their window installation explores the interplay of color relationships through formal abstraction and pattern. The relatable materials of tissue paper and string are used in consideration of the active learning community of artists young and old who participate at Oil and Cotton. Viewers are invited to contemplate and interact with the piece from both outside and inside the space. Light is an important part of the installation, as the visual interaction created by layers of colored tissue paper is transformed according to the position of the viewer and the time of day. A grid pattern is applied and translated between each window display through use of materials to create organizational clarity and movement. In contrast to the playful color of color play, negative space and absent color reflects and celebrates the creative potential of each viewer. 
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Greetings!

I would like to introduce Raza Cosmica to the Oil and Cotton community. Raza Cosmica is a window gallery devoted to collaborations between craft and fine art. Installations this year will feature artists of all ages, backgrounds, and nationalities. Located both in the classroom and on W. 7th Street, artwork on display will aid in the education of Oil and Cotton students and Oak Cliff visitors.

This Friday, September 5th at 7 pm will be the closing reception of colorplay, an installation by Jon Vogt and Abby Sherrill. Guests are invited to create their own color study inspired by Josef Alber’s Homage to the Square.

To see more works by Jon Vogt and Abby Sherrill, please visit their sites.


 
 

For more information or inquiries about Raza Cosmica, please contact:

Analise Minjarez
analiseminjarez@gmail.com                         

-or-

Oil and Cotton Creative Exchange of Dallas         
214.942.0474
info@oilandcotton.com

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Monday, August 11, 2014

Fall Studio Swap-Meet


FALL STUDIO SWAP-MEET
Oil and Cotton
September 6th, 6-9pm

This fall Oil and Cotton is hosting Studio Swap-Meet for local artists to clean out their studios of unused and scrap materials for an evening of collective bartering, trading, swapping, haggling, replacement, and exchange. All disciplines and media are encouraged as the interchanging possibilities are endless! This is a free event designed to encourage openness and communication between local artists. 

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

AND THEN I WHIRLED AT THE SOUND OF

AND THEN I WHIRLED AT THE SOUND OF
Experimental Music, Field Recordings, Sound Art
Curated by Janeil Engelstad

Oil and Cotton
Creative Exchange of Dallas
837 W. 7th Street. Dallas, Texas 75208
June 12 – July 27, 2014
Opening reception June 12, 2014 5:00 – 7:30 PM

Sound installations, listening stations with headphones and pieces broadcast intermittently throughout Oil and Cotton AND THEN I WHIRLED AT THE SOUND OF includes local and international sound artists as well as artists who work with sound in addition to other mediums

Martin Back
Iris Bechtol
Rebecca Carter
Joel Chadabe
Janeil Engelstad
Jeff Gibbons
Helen and Newton Harrison
Oto Hudec
G Monet
Carolyn Sortor
Randy Thurman
Charles Underriner
Roberto Zanata

In conjunction with AND THEN I WHIRLED AT THE SOUND OF Oil and Cotton is producing a sound art summer camp for youth, June 9 – June 13. Led by Charles Underriner the camp will include sessions on Deep Listening by Janeil Engelstad. Additionally, the youth will create a sound piece to be included in the exhibition.

For more information: www.oilandcotton.com

Image: Sea Grass Moving in Wind, Cabrillo Highway, California, 2012, by Janeil Engelstad

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Adamson High School Visual Arts Exhibition

Adamson High School Visual Arts Exhibition 2014
Reception: Friday, May 23, 5-7pm

Adamson High School Visual Arts Exhibition 2014 will highlight the outstanding accomplishments made by the students of Adamson High School in the field of visual arts during the 2013-2014 school year. The exhibit is curated by its visual art instructors, Erik Tosten and Laurie Gonzalez. This year the students have been busy exploring a range of media, from collage to ceramic sculpture, and their work demonstrates a diverse array of conceptual and creative self-expression. Come out and be impressed with the students’ level of creativity and academic diligence. Join us to celebrate the artistic achievements with the student of Adamson High School.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Through Your Intentional Practice, How Do You Help Museums Enrich the Lives of Others?


Below is a blog post written by Alli Rogers, an Oil and Cotton educator that leads our art and science based family activity every second Saturday at the Perot Museum of Nature and Sciece.

A baby screams, gravel litters the floor, and I spend the next week shaking topsoil out of my hair. It certainly isn’t glamorous, but my fingers smell like rosemary and a five-year-old is excited about Robert Smithson. Discovery Day at The Perot Museum of Nature and Science is a brutal day. Crushing crowds and cacophonous noise combine to create pandemonium throughout the museum. The day’s thematic events attract young families in particular, some of which drive for hours in order to participate. People flood the museum, armed with maps, schedules, and diaper bags. They want to see everything.

They want to visit my art making table, alluring with its herbal scent, small glass jars, and mounds of earth. Today, to go with the museum’s environmental theme, we make tiny terrariums and talk about Earthworks artists. Infants are content to dig their fingers into the soft, loamy dirt and bury their noses in bouquets of herbs. Toddlers funnel gravel,dirt, and pebbles into their jars. We take plant clippings, we overturn beakers of water. It is muddy and wonderful. Adults hover with baby wipes and weary expressions. What these parents may perceive as chaotic was planned. What seems unorganized was an intentionally planned multi-sensory, multi-age activity that provides something, though not necessarily the SAME thing, to everyone that gets their hands dirty.

I work for Oil and Cotton, a creative exchange in the Bishop Arts District of Dallas. Through Oil and Cotton, I have the opportunity to provide arts-based content at The Perot’s monthly Discovery Days as a vendor. From an educator’s point of view, this is a tall order. We need to highlight the symbiotic relationship between art and science. We need to be able to strike a balance between serving the greatest possible number of people in the most efficient amount of time while still ensuring a rich educational opportunity. We need to be a unique experience. We need to account for all ages and abilities. What can we do that is economically viable? Environmentally responsible? Safe? Representative of Oil and Cotton? That parents won’t mind lugging around in their diaper bags while holding a screaming toddler?
Most importantly, I try to ensure that our activities are appropriate in different ways for the myriad ages our table attracts. We typically serve infants, grandparents, teenagers, and everything in between, often simultaneously. What an infant learns from our table, however, is going to be different than what their grandmother learns. The infant gets to feel the soft earth on their fingertips, gets to grasp pebbles and tickle their nose with the rosemary. A teenager tries to recreate a Robert Smithson earthwork in miniature and learns to take a proper cutting from a plant. A mom takes mental notes for home. My intent is to create a community of learners, even if they only stay at my table for five minutes.